HOW TO

How to add an existing project to GitHub?

Many users don’t know How to add an existing project to GitHub, despite adding an existing project to GitHub is very easy and important.

GitHub is simply a cloud-hosted Git management tool. Git is distributed version control, meaning the entire repo and history lives wherever you put it. adding an existing project to GitHub allows you to share and collaborate in lots of great ways.

How to add an existing project to GitHub using the command line?

For windows:

  • Create a new repository on GitHub. You can also add a gitignore file, a readme, and a license if you want.
How to add an existing project to GitHub?
How to add an existing project to GitHub?
  • Open Git Bash
  • Change the current working directory to your local project.
  • Initialize the local directory as a Git repository.

git init

  • Add the files in your new local repository. This stages them for the first commit.

git add .

  • Commit the files that you’ve staged in your local repository.

git commit -m "initial commit"

  • Copy the https URL of your newly created repo
  • In the Command prompt, add the URL for the remote repository where your local repository will be pushed.


git remote add origin remote repository URL


git remote -v

  • Push the changes in your local repository to GitHub.

git push -f origin master

and now you added the existing project to GitHub.

For MAC:

  • Create a new repository on your GitHub Enterprise Server instance. To avoid errors, do not initialize the new repository with README, license, or gitignore files. You can add these files after your project has been pushed to GitHub Enterprise.
  • Open Terminal.
  • Change the current working directory to your local project.
  • Initialize the local directory as a Git repository
$ git init
  • Add the files in your new local repository. This stages them for the first commit.
$ git add .
# Adds the files in the local repository and stages them for commit. To unstage a file, use 'git reset HEAD YOUR-FILE'.
  • Commit the files that you’ve staged in your local repository.
$ git commit -m "First commit"
# Commits the tracked changes and prepares them to be pushed to a remote repository. To remove this commit and modify the file, use 'git reset --soft HEAD~1' and commit and add the file again.
  • At the top of your GitHub Enterprise repository’s Quick Setup page, click to copy the remote repository URL.
  • In Terminal, add the URL for the remote repository where your local repository will be pushed.
$ git remote add origin remote repository URL
# Sets the new remote
$ git remote -v
# Verifies the new remote URL
  • Push the changes in your local repository to your GitHub Enterprise Server instance.
$ git push -u origin master
# Pushes the changes in your local repository up to the remote repository you specified as the origin

Warning: Never git add, commit, or push sensitive information to a remote repository. Sensitive information can include, but is not limited to:

  • Passwords
  • SSH keys
  • AWS access keys
  • API keys
  • Credit card numbers
  • PIN numbers
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